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editorialbtm / July 15, 2019 Posted by : editor

An educational field trip to the MEG-Madras engineering group informally known as the Madras Sappers was organized for the students of grade 9,10 and 11. Khwaish Panwar and Diya Anil Kumar of grade 12 share their account of being surrounded by patriotism and learnings about the adverse conditions that the army officers face.

     

On entering the campus it felt like we were in a different world. There was a sense of enthusiasm, discipline and patriotism. We were all filled with curiosity. Motivational quotes such as “May God have mercy on our enemies cause we won’t” and “I did it because I was told that it was hard to do” was painted on the walls. What amazed us all was that it was like a whole different clean town in a big polluted world. There were solar panels, kitchen compost areas, cycle stands, a mini-mall, medical centers and students who were sitting in the cool breeze writing their exams.

A few soldiers showed us around. We saw different types of mines, their effect and the different ways they were arranged like the single row, double row, diagonal, zig-zag, scattered, etc. We also saw the different types of masks and shoes they wear. They showed us the different types of makeshift bridges they make and told us how the soldiers take only 8 hours to make this wonderful hanging bridge with no supporting pillars in the center. We even saw a model of the India border and all the security measures over there.

Next, we went on to the shooting range. A few soldiers were practicing and we got to see the various positions they adopt while shooting. Some were the standing position, kneeling position, sitting position, and the prone position. The sir in charge told us that the soldiers held their positions for long periods of time as practice; and for strengthening their arms and fingers they had various exercises, one being that they rolled and twisted a wet cloth.

The soldiers did everything and made everything they required, from utensils, furniture, and even decorative articles. We then went to the museum where we saw how the army uniform had evolved over the years, all the mementos India received from the different the countries, medals won by soldiers who took part in the Olympics and a huge map which marked all of India’s victories. The last part of our trip-the march past- was the most emotionally charged. It filled in us all a feeling of patriotism, teamwork, confidence, and trust.

This trip definitely taught us all something. It showed us the beautiful life of a soldier and inspired us all to join the armed forces. It taught us to be self-sufficient and independent but at the same time the importance of trust on one another and their selflessness to serve our country. Jai Hind to the Indian Armed Forces.

Writer: Khwaish Panwar XI ‘A’
Editor: Diya Anil Kumar XI ‘A’

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editorialbtm / May 08, 2024

15 English Language Mistakes That You Should Avoid

Although English is a funny language, it has become a global language. It is one of the highest-speaking languages in the world. And to effectively communicate in English is crucial in today’s time. For students, parents, and professionals alike, speaking English confidently and correctly is a necessary skill.  However, speaking in English can be tough, especially for beginners. It takes confidence and knowledge to put sentences together and express your ideas in a language that might not feel comfortable yet. Even as you get better, there are still some common errors in the English language that can sneak into your speech. Most of them aren't a big deal, but sometimes they can cause misunderstandings.  As one of the best CBSE Schools in Bangalore, we’ve identified fifteen common English language mistakes and give you tips on how to fix them, so your next conversation can go more smoothly. 

Not Speaking Enough

One common mistake is not speaking English enough. Many students feel shy to speak English at first, but speaking is one of the best ways to improve your command over the language. Imagine a cricket player who only watches others play but never picks up a bat themselves. They would never get better. The same goes for English. So, don't be afraid to use your voice. Talk with friends, ask questions to teachers in English, or even practice speaking to yourself. The more you speak, the better you'll get. 

Translating from Your Native Language

A common error in the English language many students make is trying to directly translate their thoughts from their native language into English. This is a problem because translations are rarely exact and it takes longer for your brain to do the work. Even if your English is basic, don't worry. Use the expressions and phrases you have learned. Practice using new expressions so they become a part of your regular vocabulary.. 

Emphasizing The Wrong Syllable

Another tricky English language error is emphasizing the wrong syllable. It's like singing a song out of tune. For example, "import" is pronounced as "im-PORT" not "IM-port." Another one is "address" which is pronounced as "a-DRESS" not "AD-dress." These little changes in emphasis can change the meaning of words and make it hard for others to understand.  To improve this, listen carefully to your teachers and make note of how they say the word. The best ICSE schools in Bangalore prioritize proper syllable emphasis in spoken and written English, incorporating it into the grammar lessons. Additionally, you can watch English movies, sitcoms, or cartoons to mimic how they emphasize the syllable. 

Pronouncing Sounds That Aren’t There

Pronouncing sounds that aren't there is a common mistake in English. It happens when we add extra sounds to words. For example, saying "aks" instead of "ask". To avoid this, we need to pronounce words correctly and not add any extra or unnecessary sounds.

Overuse of “Will” for Future

This is one of the most common English grammar mistakes. A lot of students rely too much on the word “will” when composing future sentences. While it may seem like the easiest option, using the more versatile structure of "going to + base form" is actually more appropriate in many situations.  "Will" is best suited for promises, spontaneous decisions, predictions, and future actions beyond the speaker's control. However, when discussing plans for the future, it is more accurate to use "going to". For instance, instead of saying "Tomorrow I will go to the bank," it is correct to say "Tomorrow I am going to the bank."

Adding Unnecessary Words and Missing Necessary Words

Another common English Grammar mistakes that students often make are adding unnecessary words or leaving out necessary ones. These errors can make sentences sound confusing or change their meaning completely. For example, saying "I am agree with you" is incorrect because the verb "agree" doesn't need the helping verb "am" before it.  On the other hand, forgetting a necessary word can also lead to problems. For instance, saying "I looking for a bus to the city center" is incorrect because the word "am" is missing. When talking about something happening right now, we use the Present Continuous tense by adding "am," "is," or "are" before the verb, along with the suffix "-ing." So, a correct version of the sentence would be "I am looking for a bus to the city center." Remember, it's important to use the correct words and structure so that your meaning is clear. 

Saying Incorrect Negative Sentences

Students often make mistakes when forming negative sentences. For instance, saying “I no like pizza" instead of "I don't like pizza." In the Present Simple, to create a negative sentence, we need to use "don't" or "doesn't" before the verb.  It's also important to remember that after "he," "she," or "it," we should use "doesn't" and remove the "-s" ending from the verb. For example, instead of saying "He's not wanting to go," the correct phrasing is "He doesn't want to go." 
  • Using the Wrong Word Order in Questions 
Using the incorrect word order in questions is another common English language mistake. For instance, asking "What you are doing now?" instead of the correct form, "What are you doing now?".  Remember word order is crucial in the English language. In questions, following this pattern is necessary: question word (what) + auxiliary verb (are) + subject (you) + verb (doing) + complement, time, place (now).  Top schools in Bangalore, like Ekya Schools, emphasize the importance of students asking questions in English and providing corrections when necessary. 

Not Using Adverbs

Many beginners don’t use adverbs in their speech. Adverbs are words that describe verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. They add more details to a sentence and make it more interesting. For example, instead of saying "he ran fast," we can say "he ran quickly." Adverbs help us paint a clearer picture of what is happening. So don't forget to use adverbs in your speech to make it livelier and more descriptive.

 Missing Comma in a Compound Sentence

Not using commas or pauses in a sentence while talking or writing can lead to confusion. It becomes difficult to distinguish between different thoughts or ideas, making the overall communication less clear. A compound sentence is made up of two independent clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction like "and" or "but."  For example, instead of saying "I went to the store and I bought some apples," we should say "I went to the store, and bought some apples." By using a comma, we can indicate the pause between the two independent clauses. This helps our listeners understand our thoughts and ideas more effectively. So, don't forget to include commas in compound sentences when you're speaking or even writing. 

Faulty sentence structure

Faulty sentence structure is a common English language error that arises when a sentence is not properly constructed. This can make the sentence difficult to read and understand. An example of this error is using too many commas, which can make a sentence disjointed and confusing. Another example is failing to use proper subject-verb agreement, which can make a sentence grammatically incorrect. To avoid this error, it's important to practice constructing sentences with clarity and precision. 

Lack of pronoun

A common error in English is forgetting to use pronouns. Pronouns replace nouns to avoid repetition. For example, instead of saying "John went to the store," just say "He went to the store." Remember to use pronouns like he, she, it, they, we, etc. 

Unnecessary Shift in Verb Tense

It occurs when there is an inconsistent change in verb tense within a sentence, paragraph, or passage. This can confuse the reader and disrupt the flow of the writing. To avoid this error, you should ensure that you maintain a consistent verb tense, making sure that all verbs match in past, present, or future tense. 

nnecessary or Missing Apostrophe 

An unnecessary or Missing Apostrophe is another common error. For example, "it's" is a contraction of "it is" and should not be used to show possession. Instead, "its" without an apostrophe indicates possession. Missing apostrophes result in incorrect pluralization, such as "apple's" instead of "apples".  

Poorly Integrated Quotation

Lastly, poorly Integrated Quotation is a common English grammar mistake. It happens when a quote is not smoothly integrated into a sentence.  For example, "She said, 'I like pizza.' instead of 'She said that she likes pizza.' To fix it, we need to integrate the quote correctly into the sentence. 

It is okay to make mistakes while learning. However, the key is to learn from those mistakes and continuously improve. Learning English may be challenging, but the rewards it brings are immeasurable. By being mindful of grammar mistakes and actively working to avoid them, you can enhance your fluency and communication skills.  So, embrace the learning journey, avoid common English language mistakes, and watch yourself grow more confident and fluent in English.  For exceptional mastery over English , consider Ekya Schools, one the best CBSE schools in Bangalore. Call 080-49609096 for more information about admissions.     

editorialbtm / May 07, 2024

What Is IGCSE And Is It the Right Choice for My Child?

Every parent wants their child to have the best education, you are no different. However, when finding the right school for your child, you are often presented with a plethora of options. One such option that has grown in popularity in recent years is the IGCSE Schools in Bangalore. It is a globally recognized board and its curriculum is designed to foster holistic growth among students.  As one of the top IGCSE schools in Bangalore, we will explain what IGCSE is and help you decide if IGCSE schools are suitable for your child.

What is IGCSE?

The International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE) is an internationally recognized board created by the University of Cambridge in England. It caters to 14–16 year olds (usually grades 9-10) and prepares them for further university studies worldwide. IGCSE courses offer a rich curriculum that tailors to individual strengths and nurtures the skills and competencies of students. Here are some of the benefits of IGCSE schools for your child.

Student-Centric Approach

The IGCSE curriculum is student-centric and fosters creativity. Teachers and students contribute equally to the class, making it an enriching experience. Learning is practical, allowing students to understand concepts better through real-life applications. IGCSE schools encourage students to ask questions, share ideas, and learn collaboratively with their peers. This approach nurtures logical and creative thinking skills in students. 

Preparing for the Universities

One of the major advantages of joining IGCSE schools is that the students here are well-prepared for further studies. This is made possible by the extensive knowledge and benefits that come from a globally standardized education. The students are encouraged to become independent thinkers and learners which is crucial for university studies. IGCSE schools focus on understanding and grasping the concepts rather than just memorizing. These are the traits most universities look for in a student. 

A Community Worldwide

The IGCSE program brings together students from all over the world in a global community. Children learn how to be inclusive and empathetic towards different people and cultures. This helps them develop a broad perspective. The program also allows each child to become a part of a diverse and comprehensive global community.

Inquiry-Based Learning

IGCSE courses foster curiosity in students by emphasizing real-life experiences, exploration, and expression. This encourages children to ask questions and research answers, helping them gain a better understanding of their communities and the world around them.

Rigorous Assessments

Top IGCSE schools in Bangalore such as Ekya Schools offer a rich experience for students with thought-provoking assessments. These include a variety of modes such as oral, written, coursework, and practical assessments. These assessments offer questions of different difficulty levels, enabling students to challenge themselves and discover their strengths and weaknesses. By instilling confidence and boosting morale, the IGCSE curriculum empowers students to plan their future educational journeys. 

Choice of Subjects that Cater to Different Abilities

The IGCSE subjects are designed to meet the needs of different students. With over 70 subjects to choose from, including 30 languages, schools can offer a combination that suits each student. Students must select at least 5 subjects, which include: 
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Humanities and Social Science
  • Languages
  • Creative, Technical, and Vocational Subjects Students also have a wide range of 30 languages to choose from, including their mother tongue.

Recognized by Universities Across the World

The IGCSE is the most recognized examination qualification across the world. Students with these qualifications are accepted into several countries like the US, UK, Germany, Canada, Australia, and Singapore. Many universities acknowledge and accept the IGCSE curriculum as part of their entrance criteria. The IGCSE opens up opportunities for further vocational education and serves as a strong foundation for employment. Students with IGCSE backgrounds have the necessary abilities that employers value in potential employees.

In conclusion, choosing the best school for your child can be a daunting task considering the number of options today. However, if you think a strong syllabus and robust curriculum are best for your child, IGCSE schools are the way to go. To find the best IGCSE schools near Bannerghatta Road, look no further than Ekya Schools in JP Nagar. Our goal is to give students a well-rounded education that nurtures critical thinking, and creativity along with academic excellence.Join us and allow your child to delve into the stimulating realm of IGCSE subjects, nurturing their personal growth and development along the way.. We're here to shape future leaders with an inclusive and inspiring learning environment.      

editorialbtm / May 06, 2024

Common Mistakes When Making A Class Presentation

A successful school presentation demands a lot more than just good content. Presentations are more about expressing and explaining things in a creative manner which involves two important parts- the content in an understandable form and its way of presenting it. The second involves speaking skills, presentation skills, voice modulation, and more. Many aspects of class presentation should be taken into consideration. However, there are a few common mistakes that are often committed during its preparation: 

Not Doing Your Research

Whatever topic you choose to present, you need to have a good knowledge about it. Well, that will only come with good research skills. You can do that by getting help from your teacher, the school library, or the Internet. Research not only helps you with better presentation but will also prepare you to answer the questions asked during the question hour.  

Not Making a Proper Introduction

 Whether the presentation is in front of a small group or you are representing your school, a small introduction about yourself along with the topic’s introduction is a must. This not only gives you a great start but also gives the audience an idea of what the presentation is about. To make your introduction a bit more interesting, you can start the presentation with a quote or some statistics to grab attention. 

Lack of preparation for the presentation

Not preparing well before the presentation day may put you in a difficult spot. It is possible that you will present well but you are internally not satisfied with your performance. Well, one of the best ways to prepare is to at least go through the content twice. Practice in front of the mirror or ask your parents to be the audience during the preparations. This way, you will get to know your weak areas and work more on them. You will be fully prepared to capture the attention of the audience with your confidence and speaking skills. 

Confident Body Language

Confidence is the key to a good presentation. It is not something that will develop overnight, we need to work on it. As per a study, poor body language affects your confidence. You need to understand that your language speaks a lot about your personality. With good content and strong body language, confidence reflects automatically. For class presentations, you can practise hand movements and voice modulation. Another important point that should not be ignored is maintaining eye contact with the audience. Before the final presentation day, it is advisable to practice in front of a mirror.

Not Being Engaging

 If you want your audience to understand the presentation well, then keep it engaging. A presentation full of text will make it boring so, to keep a balance between the infographics and text to make it more interesting and engaging. If possible, minutes of video related to your topic. This will keep your audience entertained. Remember whenever on stage  it is your responsibility to keep your audience engaged sensibly without going off-track. 

Inconsistent Slides

 Presenting slides in a good way demands a perfect framework that involves a lot of things and often focusing on one aspect might lead to ignoring others. Here are a few common slide mistakes made during the presentation. 
  1. Overcrowding the slides: It is one of the most common presentation mistakes often committed by students. You need to understand that for presentation “less is more” fits perfectly. Instead of too much text, visuals should be used. Instead of paragraphs, pointers should be used. Using different colours also makes the presentation interesting.
  2. Reading directly from the slides: Reading directly from the slides only projects you as underconfident and unprepared. Although it might seem a little tempting and an easier option, the best is to make small pointers of important topics on which you want to talk.
  3. Complicated data: Data should be presented in a way that the written content becomes more understandable. For this Pie charts or bar graphs in different colours can be used. 
  4. Not maintaining the hierarchy: Arranging the slides haphazardly
  5.  only confuses the students. It will distract them as there will be less clarity regarding the points. 

Going Off-Topic

Many times you might go off-topic to make your point more clear during the presentation. But as a presenter, you need to understand that class presentations and question sessions should be done within a time limit. For this students need to maintain the flow as per the hierarchy and should have an idea about which points need more explanation than the others. This will only come with a few practice sessions before your final day. 

Not being prepared for feedback and questions

 Once you finish your presentation, allow your audience to put their doubts in front of you. This way not only will your audience get a chance to clarify their doubts but you will also learn to tackle difficult questions. Sometimes, if you have no answer or are in doubt about the question, it is ok to accept and consider returning with better research next time.  As a presenter, you need to keep the flow of your presentation in a positive direction and end it on a positive note. It leaves a good impression on the audience. Keeping a way forward slide at the end is a good way to end. You can also present an idea about a drive you want to start in your school related to some global concern. But make sure everything is related to your topic of presentation. Nothing should go off-track.

If you are searching the internet with terms like- the best schools in Bengaluru or ICSE schools in Bangalore, CBSE syllabus schools consider Ekya Schools. We are among the leading schools in Bangalore, offering the best quality education. Our Understanding by Design (UbD) framework curriculum is designed in a way that caters not just to the academic requirements of a student but simultaneously builds the overall personality of the student.  We encourage students to actively participate in co-curricular and other group activities like presentations. This helps in building confidence and developing skills like speaking skills, presentation skills, tackling questions, and more. We have expert faculty that prepares our students for holistic development. At Ekya, different school clubs also help students develop different skills such as music, dance, coding, debating, and more.  Hopefully, the above information will be helpful.      
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Investiture 2019 – Ekya School, BTM Layout

Investiture Results for Ekya School, BTM Layout

"A ceremony at which honours or rank are formally conferred on a particular person,"  the Investiture ceremony started with a formal welcome by students, Diya Anil Kumar & Amrutha KrishnaKumar followed by an invocation song. A walk past by the student council was followed by the Badge Decoration. The oath was administered to the Student Council, following which the Head of School, Ms. Deepa Rani addressed the students. Ms. Deepa in her speech told students that to be good leaders, they do not need to be the fastest, the wisest, the smartest or the most brilliant. All they need is the courage, a bold outlook, the will to try and the faith to believe it is possible. She told the young leaders to, most importantly, believe in themselves. The Head Boy of the school Hanish Reddy then gave his first welcome address. Head Boy: Hanish Reddy Vice-Head Boy: Keerthan Subhakrith Sports Captain: Ansh Gangey Sports Vice-Captain: Aditya C Reddy Cultural Secretary: Christina Nelson Editor: Diya Anil Kumar Sub Editor: Dia K A Agni House Captain: Kartik Kothari Vice-Captain: Aisiri Haritsa Bhoomi House Captain: Anish Kulkarni Vice-Captain: Rukith Nayak Jal House Captain: Akarsh Vasudev Vice-Captain: Sameksha Vayu House Captain: Aditya Vijay Vice-Captain: Shivaprasad A Club President: Pranad C  

Field Trip to Madras Engineering Group – Ekya School JP Nagar

Students of grade 9 and 10 of Ekya School JP Nagar went on a field trip to the Madras Engineering Group, MEG, an army base in Bangalore. Here is an account of Nidhi Bhavsar, student of grade 10 on the experience at MEG.     The army base, located in Ulsoor, was a great learning experience. As we looked into the sacrifices of our soldiers pre-independence, we learned about the hardships and workings of the present day army too.  The Indian defense system consists of three main wings - the army, navy and the air force. Bangalore, having an abundance of army land of all the three wings, opens a door for students to learn about a very important aspect of a nation’s maintenance. The Madras Engineering Group or the Madras Sappers are the engineering corps for the Indian Army. They have been serving the nation since 1780, under the name of the Madras Pioneers. They were renamed as the Corps of Madras Sappers and Miners in 1831.  The visit started with the hour-long drive to the base. On entering the army base, we were told that space was a plastic-free zone. No plastic bags were allowed inside and littering was strictly forbidden. The army proves to be the epitome of discipline. We were asked to maintain silence and discipline as we took a trip around the base.  We took a round trip of the models and the museum there. A record of the sappers was kept on the walls of the museum, the information written with white paint on the wooden walls. The medals awarded filled up the museum walls, along with their names. One very memorable item on display was an American flag. If you looked closer, you would be able to see a few words written on the flag. We figured out that the flag was given to the Indian soldiers who fought with an American brigade. The soldiers had written small messages to the Indians, thanking them. One of them said - “Thank you for the friendship.” It truly was an emotional, eye-opening sight.  The museum took up quite a bit of our time, but when we exited the museum, a man gathered us all up and started to brief us on the history of The MEG. The MEG is known for mining and bridging. They deal with bombs, bridges, etc. and are responsible for demolition and building. As we know from Indian history, there were four European countries that tried setting up trade in India. The Portugese got to India first, landing in Calicut. The three others were the Dutch, the French and the British. The British’s fort in India was St.George fort. The British, as well as the French, settled down in India for trade and the two of them fought for trade in India. The British won the early wars. The British traders gradually gained territorial power and started to involve themselves in Indian politics, slowly turning it into a colony.  Mysore was not a small city then. It was the state that ruled the whole of South India. The British tried having a war with the kingdom but lost due to lack of local knowledge. During this time, there was a lack of combat pioneers which led to the rise of the Madras Pioneers in the army of the Madras Presidency. The Madras Pioneers would become the forefathers of the Corps of Engineers in the Indian Army.  An officer working in the MEG, who turned out to be our guide for the day, quickly took us to the war memorial. There were slabs of stone erected in the soil with the rank and names of soldiers who served in the regiment. We stayed there for a minute, then passed the quarter guard used for weapon storage to get to a ground. A very large ground. There were a group of soldiers in a rectangular formation standing in attention. At the front was one man, most probably their captain. Behind them was a man with a drum, the kind of drum used in parades. They were standing with a beautiful backdrop of a gate with the flag of the regiment on the sides and the Indian flag soaring at the highest point. They demonstrated a parade for us. We could hear the loud, proud words of the marshal, commanding the march. We watched the parade intently, occasionally exclaiming in awe. The soldiers marched for the next batch of students while we left to get to another building. On the way, I saw a board. It was a wooden one with this painted on it. “I hear, I forget.  I see I remember.  I do, I understand.”                 -  A trainee. It seemed interesting. The quote is something everyone should understand because a lot of life becomes easier if executed. Doing something is a more efficient way of learning, rather than letting information enter one ear and exit the other. We reached a building that had models of different types of bridges outside. The building had rows of rooms. Each room was a model room, explaining different things the MEG deals with. We were taken to a few of them and were given explanations on them. The first one had models of different explosives, the walls filled with information about the different kinds. The officer took us to a few other rooms, telling us about their work. There were rooms about bombs, bridges, the different types of gadgets used against enemies to ensure injuries on a large scale and mines. The next destination was a small bridge they had built. It was a small walk from the building of models. We walked onto the bridge when we were asked to gather at the front of it. The memories made from trips are often captured in pictures and we did not miss out on this ritual. The ninth and tenth graders had a group picture with the teachers and soldiers.  We then were taken to a small fenced place with a few targets and rifles. We could see a few soldiers holding the rifles, some sitting, some crouching, some standing and some lying down. We were told that this was a weapon training nursery. An officer there asked us to gather around him and told us that there were a few stances soldiers were taught. A soldier cannot shoot while standing when their targets are of different heights. Hence, we were briefed on different types of stances, when they were used and a few exercises soldiers were made to do to strengthen parts of their body.  There were four basic types of stances used by soldiers. They were - standing, sitting, kneeling and lying. Standing stances were used for an approximate height of 4 to 4.5 feet. Enemies were shot in the middle, chest region area, as opposed to their head. There are two reasons. First, soldiers often wear helmets, so penetration of the bullet is not guaranteed. Second, the bullet could easily miss the enemy and sail above the enemy’s head. But if shot in the chest region, even if the desired target is missed, the bullet is bound to at least hit the enemy. Kneeling positions are taken up for a target of around two and a half feet in height. The lying position is taken for a target height of one to one and a half feet. Sitting positions are incorporated when an enemy is being shot from a distance. Example, from a mountain. The soldier sits in a suitable place on a mountain and when movement is required, take up a scouting position.  We were also told about the different techniques marshals use on soldiers to strengthen a few important parts of their body and increase the accuracy of shooting. Weights are placed on the barrels of soldiers’ rifles while they are in a lying position. This strengthens their arms and shoulders. They are also repeatedly made to wring out water from the cloth into a bucket and dip the cloth in the water again. This is supposed to strengthen their fingers, and hence their grip. A coin is also sometimes placed on the barrel. This tells the coaches how much the barrel moves when soldiers shoot. If the coin falls, the soldiers are not opposing the recoil with enough force, which is an important aspect of learning how to shoot properly.  We were given the name of the rifle they were using. It was called INSAS, or the Indian Small Arms System. It has a weight of four kilograms and does not have much of an effect. It has a lesser force at which the bullet flies out.  The last destination we visited out of the seven they had prepared for us was a small room that had a display of artisan works made by the army soldiers and information on them. They had models of the types of building built by them too. We were told that soldiers were trained to be artisans too, as it was also a requirement in the army. Artisan work included carpentry, masonry, building, metallurgy, painting, etc. The soldiers made a lot of furniture. These included a shelf with hidden drawers and compartments, a ladder cum ironing table, a ladder that became a chair when the top part of the ladder was flipped over, rocking chairs, etc. They were truly very innovative making optimum use of space and materials.  The artisan room was our last stop, after which we were taken back. The experience was an educational one as well as an inspirational one. It opened our eyes to the endless possibilities and choices we have. It showed us the dedication and hard work of the soldiers of our country’s defense system. It may have inspired a few to become soldiers in the army, or made us appreciate the comfort of living in a country like India. Either way, every student took away something from the field trip. Soldiers train for years, their blood, sweat, and tears all for the safety of someone else. They lay down their lives to protect the country that has given them a home. They shed blood to give us a better life. They become physically as well as mentally strong to endure the years to come. The years of war and fighting to protect their sacred homeland. The defense system is an underappreciated but crucial cog in the great wheel that is the Indian government. So let us take a moment to pray for the soldiers that are, have been and will be.  Jai Hind. 
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